FMCBC provides comment on the Vancouver Island Land Use Plan

Posted on Posted in Advocacy, E-News, Rec&Con

Mt Doug 2The FMCBC was one of the original stakeholders involved in the Commission on Resources and Environment (CORE) process during the early 1990s and the establishment of the Vancouver Island Land Use Plan (VILUP) in 1994.  It has now been 20 years since the VILUP was established and University of Alberta Masters Student Sabrina Schwartz contacted the FMCBC to participate in a study titled: The Vancouver Island Land Use Plan, 20 Years Later.  A review of the VILUP in the light of current and future stakeholder needs.

The study looks at how the VILUP provided a slight increase in protected areas on Vancouver Island, but did not resolve the land and resource conflicts between the various stakeholders.  Over the years the VILUP has raised some awareness of various stakeholder interests and has played a role in improving communications between these various stakeholders, but the results from the study show that many stakeholders still feel that their interests are not seriously considered when land use decisions are made on Vancouver Island.  Schwartz’s study includes sections specifically targeting the Outdoor Recreation Sector which are worth a read.  Below are some links to articles relating to the VILUP over the past 20 years.

Government of British Columbia’s Strategic Land and Resource Planning page for Vancouver Island.

Government of British Columbia press release from June 22, 1994 announcing the VILUP:  VANCOUVER ISLAND LAND-USE PLAN PROTECTS RAINFORESTS,SECURES JOBS

The Vancouver Island Land Use Plan: Renewing our Forests – Securing Our Future – Government of British Columbia, 1994

Completing the Vancouver Island Land-Use Plan – report from the Protected Areas Boundary Advisory Team, February 1996

Vancouver Island Summary Land Use Plan – released by Government of British Columbia in February 2000

Watershed Sentinel October, 2013 article:  Timber Grab on Vancouver Island

 

 

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